myths mistold

the yellow man in the hat

The reason for Gone Girl’s peculiar lack of aftereffect could be that it’s set in a world that looks real and yet is not. In it, clichés are reveled in rather than subverted. Nick and Amy see themselves as types as opposed to individuals. Ever-changing types, sure, sometimes “Cool Girl,” sometimes “Average Dumb Woman Married to Average Shitty Man,” trying on and discarding ready-made identities so fast and frequently you never quite glimpse the human face underneath. Says Flynn, “I was playing with the idea of how hard it is in this day and age to have an authentic self. We become creatures that we’ve made up of different flotsam from pop culture.” And t’s this aspect of Gone Girl—the all artifice, all the time—that proved so troubling to writer Mary Gaitskill, causing her to publish one doozy of a slam in Bookforum. (“Gone Girl’s sickening worldview” is the essay’s subtitle; the punch line, too.) Gaitskill was missing the point. Missing a point, anyway, which is that if Gone Girl’s a shallow book, that’s because surface is the only thing that interests it. And if you miss that point, you miss an even more important one, which is that Gone Girl’s not a shallow book at all. It’s cultural criticism of the most trenchant kind, only it’s too hip to present itself in such earnest, bluestocking terms. It’s cultural criticism with a sexpot-noir face. And scratch that earlier observation about it not resembling any other novel. It’s a dead ringer for Bret Easton Ellis’ American Psycho, an­other surreally entertaining/surreally monstrous, ultraseductive/ultrarepellent, playing-it-straight/playing-it-satirical postmodernist masterpiece with a sociopath at its center. Two books that defined their eras.Inside the Dangerous Mind of Gone Girl’s Gillian Flynn

The reason for Gone Girl’s peculiar lack of aftereffect could be that it’s set in a world that looks real and yet is not. In it, clichés are reveled in rather than subverted. Nick and Amy see themselves as types as opposed to individuals. Ever-changing types, sure, sometimes “Cool Girl,” sometimes “Average Dumb Woman Married to Average Shitty Man,” trying on and discarding ready-made identities so fast and frequently you never quite glimpse the human face underneath. Says Flynn, “I was playing with the idea of how hard it is in this day and age to have an authentic self. We become creatures that we’ve made up of different flotsam from pop culture.” And t’s this aspect of Gone Girl—the all artifice, all the time—that proved so troubling to writer Mary Gaitskill, causing her to publish one doozy of a slam in Bookforum. (“Gone Girl’s sickening worldview” is the essay’s subtitle; the punch line, too.) Gaitskill was missing the point. Missing a point, anyway, which is that if Gone Girl’s a shallow book, that’s because surface is the only thing that interests it. And if you miss that point, you miss an even more important one, which is that Gone Girl’s not a shallow book at all. It’s cultural criticism of the most trenchant kind, only it’s too hip to present itself in such earnest, bluestocking terms. It’s cultural criticism with a sexpot-noir face. And scratch that earlier observation about it not resembling any other novel. It’s a dead ringer for Bret Easton Ellis’ American Psycho, an­other surreally entertaining/surreally monstrous, ultraseductive/ultrarepellent, playing-it-straight/playing-it-satirical postmodernist masterpiece with a sociopath at its center. Two books that defined their eras.

Inside the Dangerous Mind of Gone Girl’s Gillian Flynn

(Source: connietough, via aaronsjohnson)

Anonymous asked: Funny story about Dr. Acula,. They played 242 Main in Vermont. Called the crowd faggots, people did not like that so they stopped watching, in response to this one of the keyboardist jumped off stage and punched one of the kids (and I mean that literally). Fight gets broken up, concert is put on hold, while that happens the keyboardist almost starts crying saying "we only wanted to play our music for the kids" then the band proceeds to throw bricks at kids after the show ends.

selfdefensefamily:

Wasn’t really riding with them until the bricks part. Now I’m a fan.

Best band.